Tag Archives: creativity

Living the Dream on a Truck Bed of Roses

We’ve just begun breaking in our restored/rebuilt 1950 Chevy 3100 Pickup Truck. It was a real treat last weekend to finally pull our custom home-built teardrop trailer with this beautiful vintage truck.

My fascination with this truck (and others like her) is that she has aged gracefully. I love that she is still pretty, tough, and practical, too. We’ve been calling the truck “Ruby,” but Mark says she’s a whole lot like me. I’ll take that as a compliment. I hope I age as well as she has.  🙂

Today, we made a run to the store to gather up materials for a raised-bed planter in the backyard where we’ll plant a variety of tomatoes, but we also committed to buying roses, even though we only rent our current home. They were far too beautiful and fragrant to pass up. I know they will bring us a lot of joy.

We’re looking forward to a few summertime camping trips up north in Arizona this year, where Ponderosa Pines in the high mountains will protect us from the desert heat.

Hope you all are doing as well as we are. If not, we wish you better days ahead.

Love,


RELATED POSTS:

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore/Rebuild_1: Committing to the Project

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_2: Prepping Chassis and Engine

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_3: Hard Body Meets Firm Foundation

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_4: Grilling on a Sunday Afternoon

Building Our Teardrop Trailer From Scratch: Learning by Doing

Photos of Our Own Home-Built, Custom Teardrop Trailer

Details, Details, Details: Adding a Side Grill to our Teardrop Trailer

This week, Mark added a side grill to our home-built, custom teardrop trailer, because, you know, he can! (I LOVE this man!)

When we initially designed our teardrop trailer, which really was a bit more like winging than designing (check out my blog post:  Building Our Teardrop Trailer From Scratch: Learning by Doing) we made note ahead of time of some key features we wanted to include.

One feature, right off the bat, was to install an extra deep stainless steel sink that could easily hold a large spaghetti pot.

Another was to install rails all around the rear of the trailer to accommodate table tops wherever we might need ’em. Our thought on this was to stay modular in our design, ready to accommodate future needs.

Well, this week, a need (really a “want”) arose when Mark decided he wanted to add an extra grill besides the neat slide-out, cast iron, double-burner grill we already enjoy.

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As you may note in the picture above, besides the rear-right rail being used by our fold-out table, there’s also a rail on the right side panel of the trailer near the electric socket. We have the same exact two-rail configuration on the left side of our teardrop trailer as well.

So when Mark decided he wanted to make use of an old barbecue grill, we talked about a design for making it safe and stable so our 80-lb Lab/Shepherd couldn’t accidentally knock it over. All said and done, we came up with this:

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“Is that grill smoking,” you ask?

Why, “Yes, it is!”

How can one set up a grill and not fire it up?

Salmon burgers, here . . . we . . . come!

teardrop trailer, vintage trailer, custom trailer, camping, tiny trailer, DIY, build details

teardrop trailer, vintage trailer, custom trailer, camping, tiny trailer, DIY, build details

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We love our ever-morphing teardrop trailer! We especially love all her details, details, details!

Make sure to have fun with YOUR teardrop trailer! Even if you buy it new or already customized by a previous owner, make sure to add those details that make it your own!



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Happy trails, y’all!

Sue J signature

Bet You Never Viewed a Solar Eclipse THIS Way!

Shoeboxes? We don’t need no stinkin’ shoeboxes!

– quote by Sue J., inspired by Pacino  🙂


Impromptu Experiment:
Quickly craft a solar eclipse viewing mechanism without the use of the old shoebox method most of us are accustomed to

Materials:
Whatever the heck we can find around the house (excluding boxes because, well, we had no suitable boxes; hence, the need for an impromptu project . . . still with us? Good. Moving on . . .)

Allowable Timeframe for Completing Project:
Five minutes. Make or break, we clearly have more important things to do, but Heck, this is fun!


THE EXPERIMENT

I start off with the requisite foil square and poke a hole in it so the sun can do its job.

Next, a piece of paper that’ll serve as a projection screen. White paper is too bright, so Mark grabs a manilla folder.

I grab a metal clamp off the kitchen table (Hey, in a house inhabited by at least one mechanically minded person, if not often two, it’s not unusual to find a clamp, pliers, tape measure, etc., as part of the dining area decor.) figuring it would add to the scientific ambiance if we use a tool to hold the foil rather than just our hands.

Mark runs out the door, me trailing close behind with necessary paraphernalia in hand.

Folder. Check!

Foil. Check!

BAM! Solar Eclipse. Cooooooooooooool.

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new method, new way of viewing a solar eclipse, safely viewing a solar eclipse, fun way of viewing solar eclipse

Design Improvement Attempt #1:

Mark tries to free his hands from having to hold the clamp so we can view it in a hands-free, all-mind, zen-like peace. He tries to hang the foil from a tie-down wire on the patio, but the angle isn’t working.

Back to the initial viewing configuration. But, hey, what’s this? THREE eclipses?

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Way cool.

Sunlight is projecting not only through the foil, but through a cut-through hole in the clamp and through a tiny space between his fingers.

Design Improvement Attempt #2:

We don’t need no stinkin’ clamp!

We don’t need no stinkin’ foil!

VOILA! Solar Eclipse Au Naturel! 

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Who ever would have thought it’d be this simple to watch a solar eclipse?

Grins of accomplishment all around, slaps on backs, high fives, a couple of atta boys and atta girls.

Mission accomplished on all fronts (fun, discovery, and nature combined. . . cool, cool, and cool).  🙂