Pregnant Again

She’s done it again. Overplayed her hand. Underestimated the magical powers of her own fertility.

“What?” she says. “It’s not my fault. I’m just doin’ what comes naturally!”

“Fine,” we say, scratching our heads. “Now, what are we to do with all the offspring? There are hundreds of them. How will we ever find homes for them all?”

Ah, but look at them. They’re so beautiful, each and every one of them. And delicious, too. Pink. And sweet. And perfectly edible.

No way will we be able to consume all this fruit ourselves, and we absolutely WON’T let it sit and rot on the tree. Today, we began the process of harvesting these babies, bagging ’em, and sharing them with our entire neighborhood.

Abundance of this magnitude reminds me of the Law of Abundance in general. There is more than enough on this planet to sustain us all. Nature is willing to provide as long as we are willing to take care of nature. When we are so fortunate to receive nature’s gifts and God’s blessings, we must do all we can to share what we have and try not to let anything go to waste.

Wishing you ABUNDANCE,

Fantastic AND FREE National Park Map Resource!

national park map, map resource

One guy. One website. TONS of FREE maps of every sort, related to our National Parks.

Click here for the website –>   NATIONAL PARK MAPS

This extremely thorough website and project is clearly a labor of love. If you camp, backpack, hike, or just plain old visit the incredible National Park system we as citizens of the United States so far been blessed to have in the first place. (Thank you, Teddy Roosevelt! Thank you, every environmentalist! Thank you every selfless, kind-hearted politician that protects our parks–ok, I know you are few, but thanks to those of you who do! Thank you every activist who fights the good fight to keep these amazing National Parks clean, secure and abundant in healthy flora and fauna!)

I don’t know about you folks who read my blog, but I view the National Parks as an emblem of what is meant by “America, the beautiful.” Without them, American wouldn’t be so beautiful. So, please do what you can to preserve what we have right now, to keep anyone from destroying it, degrading it, AND ESPECIALLY FROM CAPITALIZING on it for monetary gain.

I love you guys and gals who respect our parks enough to always leave ’em looking better than they did when you first got there. So many folks continue polluting and defacing our National Parks. Common sense and respect are fading fast in our society. It’s hard to keep up with it’s negative impact. So, everything you do to mitigate that reality, to balance out the bozo heads around you, really makes a tremendous difference. Never forget that!

Thanks and ENJOY!

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_4: Grilling on a Sunday Afternoon

When Mark said he’d be grilling this Sunday, silly me to think he was talking about a couple of juicy steaks on the barby, corn on the cob, maybe a dozen grilled jumbo shrimp. I blindly set out to make an awesome side salad to go with the grilled goods, but alas, I’m still standing here kinda hungry.

I should have known, Mark still has not recovered from a severe case of “truck rebuild on the brain.” I’m not dissin’ him. When it comes to this 1950 Chevy 3100 Pickup Truck Rebuild (1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore/Rebuild_1: Committing to the Project ), it may have started out as an “us” project, but it is most certainly a Mark project. Too many aspects of this project have required Mark’s wide and deep knowledge and life experience to make it all just right. I’ve been watching in amazement on the sidelines, oohing and aahing at his fine engineering and immense patience in working out the zillions of unexpected kinks in this once-in-a-lifetime project.  (Mark SWEARS he will NOT be doing a project like this EVER again!)

Last you saw, she looked something like this . . .

Chevy 3100 pick-up truck, restoration, rebuild, restore, built from scratch, body, old chassis, new chassis, Teardrop Adventures, teardrop trailers

NOW, she’s looking more like this . . .

With this rebuilt, re-engineered engine tucked neatly (if not SNUGly!) in the engine compartment . . .

One of the final pieces to the puzzle is the grill that Mark realigned and wet sanded today . . .

After sanding it, Master Mark gave the grill a spectacular paint job . . .

Soon (tomorrow?), the grill will finally find its way back home on the old 1950 Chevy 3100 Pickup Truck she started her journey on, only now she’ll look prettier than she used to. (Thanks, Mark! You know my heart was stuck on chrome, but now that I see her paired up with the rest of the truck, I think it’s a match made in heaven.)

Next, Mark will paint the underside of the hood, so we can reattach that as well. (Yeah, this is the rare occasion where I can say ‘we’ . . . I’ve redeemed myself on occasion by at least being of help lifting the bed off the chassis, or lifting the hood or fenders when needed. <“Right, honey?”>)

I’m so excited. My re-imagined, rebuilt antique pickup truck is nearly ready to roll!

As always, stay tuned for updates!

Happy Restoring, Re-using, and Re-purposing to all you builders and restorers out there!


Related Articles in this 1950 Chevy Restore/Rebuild series:

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore/Rebuild_1: Committing to the Project

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_2: Prepping Chassis and Engine

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore/Rebuild_3: Hard Body Meets Firm Foundation


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1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_3: Hard Body Meets Firm Foundation

ATTACHING THE BODY TO THE NEWER CHASSIS

Okay, so this is where the FUN starts.

Big airplane hangar to play in.

Big forklifts to drop the body parts on the chassis (Is this a Stephen King novel? lol).

Big-time sweating and swearing till we got ‘er done.

It all started here . . . 1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore/Rebuild_1: Committing to the Project. By now, we’ve advanced considerably in the project.

This is the third update on the progress of our 1950 Chevy 3100 restoration and rebuild, reflecting one of our more active days, just before summer got cranking in Arizona. So much has happened in the last several months, enough that writing about it has become a luxury. But I’m here to make amends and keep on keeping on.

We’ve been so lucky to have an aircraft junkyard at our disposal–a large work space where we could tackle the tougher elements of our build, however long it took, and where we could have access to industrial-grade lift equipment to make our lives easier.

On this part of the build, we’re pulling the cab and truck bed from the old, original 1950 Chevy 3100 chassis and attaching them to the 1989 Chevy S10 chassis that’s been reworked and prepped for this build.

BUT FIRST . . . ONE LAST DRIVE IN THE OLD TRUCK BEFORE SHE GETS A MAKEOVER:

AND NOW TO STRIP HER OF ANY UNNECESSARY BODY PARTS BEFORE HEADING TO THE AIRCRAFT JUNKYARD:

Chevy 3100 pick-up truck, restoration, rebuild, restore, built from scratch, body, old chassis, new chassis, Teardrop Adventures, teardrop trailers

ONE LAST TIME LISTENING TO HER OLD ENGINE RUN; NOT BAD FOR A 66-YEAR-OLD ENGINE! . . .

TIME TO REMOVE THE CAB AND BED FROM THE ORIGINAL CHASSIS, WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM TEREX :

Somebody came by that very morning, bought the old chassis from us, and carted it away. Bye bye, now!

Chevy 3100 pick-up truck, restoration, rebuild, restore, built from scratch, body, old chassis, new chassis, Teardrop Adventures, teardrop trailers

A LOT OF MEASURING, A TON OF FINESSING,  AND AMPLE PREP-WORK TO CREATE SUPPORTS NECESSARY AND GET ‘EM WELDED IN THE RIGHT PLACES:

IRONMAN RETURNS:

Chevy 3100 pick-up truck, restoration, rebuild, restore, built from scratch, body, old chassis, new chassis, Teardrop Adventures, teardrop trailers

THE MOMENT WE HAD BEEN WAITING FOR, LOWERING THE CAB AND BED ONTO THE NEWER CHASSIS:

SUCCESS! SHE’S BACK TOGETHER AGAIN . . .

But on a chassis that will be able to handle the spacing and structure necessary for our upgraded brakes, suspension, engine, safety, and convenience requirements:

Chevy 3100 pick-up truck, restoration, rebuild, restore, built from scratch, body, old chassis, new chassis, Teardrop Adventures, teardrop trailers

This part of the project–transporting the truck to the junkyard, stripping her body from the previous chassis, prepping the newer chassis, and dropping the body onto the new chassis–took an entire day, start to finish.

Our truck is looking great (check out the optical illusion of her bed already filled up with rakes and shovels . . .

Chevy 3100 pick-up truck, restoration, rebuild, restore, built from scratch, body, old chassis, new chassis, Teardrop Adventures, teardrop trailers

but she’ll have to stay another day at the junkyard, so Mark can tackle attaching the engine and transmission. This part of the project I won’t be much help with. But as always, I have every confidence he will get the job done, and he’ll do it well. It’s what he does.

Once the engine and transmission are in, we can have our truck transported back to our home, where we can tackle the rest of the project in the comfort of our own garage. With the hot summer weather in Arizona, a garage fashioned with a swamp cooler will be a welcome treat.

Chevy 3100 pick-up truck, restoration, rebuild, restore, built from scratch, body, old chassis, new chassis, Teardrop Adventures, teardrop trailers
Me, messing around with photographing TEREX as seen through our 1950 Chevy 3100 side-view mirror. 🙂

Stay tuned for updates!

Happy Restoring, Re-using, and Re-purposing to all you builders and restorers out there!


Related Articles in this 1950 Chevy Restore/Rebuild series:

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore/Rebuild_1: Committing to the Project

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_2: Prepping Chassis and Engine


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Angels on the Road: Highway Breakdown

This past Sunday evening, at a dark and dismal highway rest stop somewhere between California and Arizona, our car broke down. With all the spectacle and force of Yellowstone’s “Old Faithful” geyser, caustic anti-freeze steam rose from the car’s engine, giving off a sour smell that turned rancid as fumes touched our tongues. Violent bursts of boiling hot greenish water erupted from within the radiator and from deep within the engine’s bowels, scorching the asphalt landscape underneath.

We had been traveling with a fully-packed car and a fully-packed trailer, making our way from California to Arizona. “We” included me, Mark, and Mark’s son who only weeks earlier decided to take the big leap from High School graduation in California to the possibilities of college education in Arizona.

Besides crossing state lines, Mark’s son also would be leaping from living with his mother to living with us. To be honest, this part of his decision was ground-breaking, heaven-blessed news. No sooner had he said YES did we empty our teardrop trailer to make room for a mattress, clothes, and everything else one accumulates in 17 years of living. Over a three-day weekend, we made the seven hour trip to Cali before the whims of teenage change shifted out of our favor.

But halfway along our jubilant drive home to Arizona, just about an hour before we expected to exit California, we got the message from the universe, “Whoa! Not so easy!”

There we stood at a highway rest stop—sun setting, front hood open, puddles of hot water at our feet—realizing we had more to deal with than waiting for an engine to cool. We definitely had a significant leak somewhere and only so much time left in our flashlight battery life to successfully diagnose just where.

Compounding our problem, Mark couldn’t fit under our low-profile PT Cruiser to diagnose where he needed to. Even if he could locate the car jack buried under boxes in the car, we both knew he wasn’t small enough to fit underneath the car.

That’s when I saw it . . . “the look” on Mark’s face.

He did his best to poker-face through troubleshooting, but the look dripped out and spilled all over his face. The look said, we’re screwed.

At a minimum, we needed a repair shop, a replacement hose, and more than a snow cone’s chance in Hades that we could have our car AND trailer towed for less than a small fortune. We already knew the chances of any repair shop or auto parts store being open late Sunday night were slim to none. We also knew chances were slim the next small town would even have those options available, let alone hotel accommodations if we had to wait till morning.

As for our trailer, leaving it behind in favor of having the car alone towed demanded our up-front acceptance that said trailer would likely be stolen or ransacked before we returned to claim it.

Reality dictated we had to deal with our dilemma alone. Even though Mark knows his way in and out of engines, unless he magically lost 50 pounds, there was no way he could fit under and fix the car; hence, “the look.”

Shortly after that realization, from out of the dark, a black car backed up to ours. Out from it appeared a man of small stature, wearing a neat, white shirt and light-colored shorts that hung well past his knees.

“Jou got problems with jour car?” the Spanglish-speaking man asked Mark.

“Uh, Yeah, but it’s no easy fix. It’s leaking somewhere underneath, but I can’t get under to find it.”

“I mechanic. I help.”

“But we can’t fit under . . . ”

“Under car? No problem. I fit,” the man said.

“No. You can’t. It’s too tight, and you’ll ruin your . . . ”

“I fit!” he said, waving an arm behind him, shushing away Mark’s concerns while bee lining to the trunk of his car. Within seconds, he emerged with a sturdy car jack. We had already rolled the front left tire onto a low curb, but the little man jacked it up even higher and gave it a good shake to make sure it was stable. Without hesitation, he slipped under the car on a blanket we laid down to protect his body and clothing.

Mark and I looked at each other in quizzical amusement, as if to say Are ya’ kiddin’ me? Who IS this guy?

“An angel,” I uttered out loud.

“No kidding,” he said, and then called down into the engine, “Hey, what’s your name?”

“Rodrigo,” came the reply.

“Rodriguez?” Mark asked.

“Rodrigo.”

“Rodrico?”

“No, no.”

“Hey, how about I call you Rod?”

“Okay,” Rodrigo said, clearly relieved.

Eventually, after lots of radiator water refills, engine turnovers, and poking around our car’s underbelly, “Rod” emerged with the broken hose. Just what Mark did and didn’t want to see.

Rod checked the time on his watch, looked up at the black sky while his brain ran a calculation. He shook his head right, left, and back again, saying, “Las nueve. Auto parts closed.” He let out a weighted sigh, so we did too. Screwed.

Then Rod perked up. “I want to try . . . ” he said, as he animated for us that he would cut the damaged end off the hose and try to re-seat it.

Mark had his doubts. The hose was very short already and seemed to be an exact, necessary length. “I see what you’re saying, but I think we’re gonna need a new hose.”

“I have hose,” Rod said.

“What?” Mark asked. “You have a hose?”

“Si.”

“You have a hose.”

“Si. But we try this first. Okay?”

“You have a hose,” Mark repeated, like a skipping record.

“Si,” he said, signaling Mark and me to follow him over to the trunk of his car. “I pick up today from junkyard, from old Ford car.”

In Rod’s car trunk were several grocery bags of pulled parts from old cars, with several hoses in one of the bags–one of which was a potential match for our broken hose. Also in the trunk were eight bags of groceries. And from inside Rod’s car emerged a young mother and three small children.

Mark held the hose up into the dim light, turning it around, examining it. It wasn’t perfect, but it looked like it could work. I watched his wrinkled brow relax, as he turned his fascination to Rod. “Where did you come from?” Mark asked.

” Qué ? . . . my car,” Rod said.

“No, where did you come from?”

Rod tried again. “Blythe,” he said, but clearly the question remained over his head.

You’re heaven sent,” I said, but Rod still didn’t understand.

For the next several hours, over and over again, Rod disappeared under the engine and emerged with arms covered in black oil. I remained at the ready, handing him several paper towels to clean his arms each time he reappeared. Each time, he eagerly explained what he’d done and found so far, then he and Mark discussed the next thing he was going under to do.

At some point, Rod came up from under the car, covered in oil again, and looked over at his wife, gesturing whether he should take off his white shirt before it was too late. She nodded in the affirmative, saying “Oooooh, Sexy!” while Rod carefully pulled the shirt over his head. We all laughed while he shrugged his shoulders as if to say, It is what it is.

Most of the time, Rod’s wife and children milled around, easily keeping themselves entertained. And Mark’s son, rather than brooding ad nauseum about his battery-dead iPhone and the clear mistake of agreeing to take this trip, instead helped out by taking on the role of water fetcher.

All the while, Mark and I flashed “the other look” . . . the Oh-my-God-we-are-in-the-midst-of-heavenly-intervention-right-now look. We smiled softly at one another, shook our heads in disbelief, and silently counted our blessings.

Even when Rod’s youngest son collapsed into a tear-filled meltdown after he or one of his siblings accidentally slammed a car door on his fingers, Rod checked in on the crying child, but quickly came back to work on our car. Even while the groceries in the back of their car were warming in 70 to 80-degree temperatures, Rod kept working on our car. Even though Rod’s family had been out the entire day themselves and seemed tuckered out, Rod kept working on our car.

Just about midnight, Rod and Mark fixed the car enough to make it drive-able. Whether it would get us all the way home remained in question, but our odds had improved significantly.

Realizing we had a good chance of making it home, we fought back tears and squeezed Rod with heartfelt hugs. I hugged Rod’s wife and thanked her profusely for her family’s great kindness and patience, to which she simply said, “We had this happen to us once. We remember what it was like.”

Mark and I scrounged up $60 between us and gave it to Rod, apologizing for our meager offering. He received it graciously and said, “Remember, you buy good hose from dealer. You return old hose to me. Si?”

“Si. Yes,” we said. His wife scribbled their address on a writing pad for us, which I promptly stuffed on the dashboard of our car. Rod had just offered—no . . . insisted upon— closely following us on the road for the next 40 miles to make sure we were all right. He gave us his phone number in case of emergency.

Forty-five minutes later on the highway, we hung out our car windows, enthusiastically waving goodbye as Rod and his family took the exit ramp for “Lovekin Road.”

“Lovekin,” Mark said. “How appropriate.”

“I think we’ll need to drop off that hose in person,” I said, as I grabbed the writing pad from the dashboard.

“Without question,” Mark said. “I think we’ve made friends for life.”

For the rest of the ride home, Mark and I battled to stay awake. We walked in the door at 4 AM, grateful to make it home. We credited Rod and God for keeping us safe. Every time we almost nodded off in the car, we stirred up conversation again about Rod and the good fortune of his timely appearance.

Like many other folks, we have often pondered, Do angels exist? And if so, Where do angels come from?

We know the answer now. Angels do exist. They come unexpectedly from out of nowhere in exactly the form needed and with exactly what is needed to save us from despair. And apparently, at least according to the information on our writing pad, some angels come from “Blythe, California” and go by the name “Rodrigo.”

According to at least one source on the internet, Rodrigo generally means: “You are a law unto itself. Your tendency is to finish whatever you start. You are tolerant and like to help humanity. You are generally warmhearted and give freely of your time, energy, and sympathetic understanding. You have tolerance and acceptance of the frailties of others. Universal and humanitarian in outlook. This is a very compassionate name.”

We concur. Rodrigo was our angel for the night and lived up, in every way, to the meaning of his perfectly assigned name.

Peace to you all as you travel the highways and roads of life.

May you be as fortunate as we were this weekend to experience and recognize the limitless gifts of the universe.

Love each other. Help each other. Be nothing but kind to each other, and I guarantee it will come back to you a thousand fold.

Love,

Sue J signature

Happy Mother’s Day, Mother Nature!

Thank you, Mother Nature, for some of the most amazing experiences in the last several years out here in the western United States!

Photos of Our Own Home-Built, Custom Teardrop Trailer

We built our teardrop trailer in 2011, from the tip of her trailer hitch to the top of her roof racks! She was inspired by the first teardrop trailer we ever saw–a used Camp-Inn brand trailer.

We built her (Building Our Teardrop Trailer From Scratch: Learning by Doing) before we saw all the amazing variations of teardrops there are nowadays . . . old and new. Still, we love her for the custom trailer she is and for the mere fact we never built such a thing before, but we embarked on the challenge anyway . . . together. We built her without plans. We built her with only a picture to go by. We built her loosely on what we saw, but specifically on what we wanted in her, from her.  And we couldn’t be happier!

We love her and hope you do too!

Our teardrop trailer

 

teardrop trailer, vintage, vintage-style, gathering, Perris, CA, Southern California, 2014
The galley of our home-built, vintage-style teardrop trailer
Foot-bed area of our home-built, custom teardrop trailer.
Foot-bed area of our home-built, custom teardrop trailer.
Headboard area of our home-built, custom teardrop trailer.
Headboard area of our home-built, custom teardrop trailer.

Galley Resized

 


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Details, Details, Details: Adding a Side Grill to our Teardrop Trailer

This week, Mark added a side grill to our home-built, custom teardrop trailer, because, you know, he can! (I LOVE this man!)

When we initially designed our teardrop trailer, which really was a bit more like winging than designing (check out my blog post:  Building Our Teardrop Trailer From Scratch: Learning by Doing) we made note ahead of time of some key features we wanted to include.

One feature, right off the bat, was to install an extra deep stainless steel sink that could easily hold a large spaghetti pot.

Another was to install rails all around the rear of the trailer to accommodate table tops wherever we might need ’em. Our thought on this was to stay modular in our design, ready to accommodate future needs.

Well, this week, a need (really a “want”) arose when Mark decided he wanted to add an extra grill besides the neat slide-out, cast iron, double-burner grill we already enjoy.

Canyonlands National Park, Utah, The Mighty Five, Utah tourism, vintage teardrop trailer travels, U.S. road trip, Utah national parks, hiking, sightseeing, photography

As you may note in the picture above, besides the rear-right rail being used by our fold-out table, there’s also a rail on the right side panel of the trailer near the electric socket. We have the same exact two-rail configuration on the left side of our teardrop trailer as well.

So when Mark decided he wanted to make use of an old barbecue grill, we talked about a design for making it safe and stable so our 80-lb Lab/Shepherd couldn’t accidentally knock it over. All said and done, we came up with this:

teardrop trailer, vintage trailer, custom trailer, camping, tiny trailer, DIY, build details teardrop trailer, vintage trailer, custom trailer, camping, tiny trailer, DIY, build details

“Is that grill smoking,” you ask?

Why, “Yes, it is!”

How can one set up a grill and not fire it up?

Salmon burgers, here . . . we . . . come!

teardrop trailer, vintage trailer, custom trailer, camping, tiny trailer, DIY, build details

teardrop trailer, vintage trailer, custom trailer, camping, tiny trailer, DIY, build details

teardrop trailer, vintage trailer, custom trailer, camping, tiny trailer, DIY, build details

We love our ever-morphing teardrop trailer! We especially love all her details, details, details!

Make sure to have fun with YOUR teardrop trailer! Even if you buy it new or already customized by a previous owner, make sure to add those details that make it your own!



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Lemmon Eye Candy: Sunset Photo Gallery, Mt. Lemmon, Tucson, AZ

Valentine’s Day 2016. Desert cactus. Snow skiing. Stunning sunset after hiking. Prepare yourself for eye candy a.k.a. a photo gallery of our day trip to Mt. Lemmon in Tucson, AZ.

We started with desert cactus at the base . . .

and wound up in snow at the peak . . .

followed by hiking and spectacular Lemmon candy at sunset . . .

and perhaps my favorite photo of the day . . .

LemmonMtn_DSC02028_UR‘Nuf said!



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Hope your Valentine’s Day was just as special.

XOXO

Sue J signature

Get Yer Kicks in Williams, AZ: Gateway to Grand Canyon’s South Rim

Need a ROUTE 66 fix? Need a GRAND CANYON fix? Need a CAMPING fix? Need a FOOD fix or a MUSIC fix? Get Yer Kicks in Williams, AZ, just one hour from the GRAND CANYON.

Williams, AZ, Arizona tourism, Route 66Twice in the past year, we made a stop in Williams, AZ, with our teardrop trailer. We had a great time both times, enough to say that from now on, Williams will remain on our must-do list when heading up from our current home in Phoenix, AZ, to Grand Canyon National Park.

The town of Williams, AZ is a really great place to visit on your way to or from the south entrance of the Grand Canyon. We enjoyed it’s cozy, eclectic, old-town feel . . .

it’s restaurants (Cruiser’s Route 66 Cafe) . . .

Williams, AZ, Arizona tourism, Route 66
Excellent ribs at Cruiser’s Route 66 Cafe in Williams, AZ

it’s music  (Vincent Z performing at Cruiser’s Route 66 Cafe) . . .

Williams, AZ, Arizona tourism, Route 66
Musician Vincent Z (www.vincentzmusic.com) providing excellent entertainment while we dined at Cruiser’s Route 66 Cafe in Williams, AZ

it’s plentiful gift shops . . .

Williams, AZ, Arizona tourism, Route 66

and even the shoot-em-up cowboy showdown that erupted in the streets (promptly at scheduled show times throughout the day) . . .

Williams, AZ, Arizona tourism, Route 66 Williams, AZ, Arizona tourism, Route 66

We were even entertained by our friend, Dave, while we waited for our food to arrive at Cruiser’s Restaurant . . .

One more great thing in Williams, AZ, is you can wander over to the Grand Canyon Railway railroad station and treat yourself to a comfortable, scenic ride to the Grand Canyon by train. They have all kinds of events going on, including the popular Christmastime “Polar Express” ride (something I think I’ll make a point of doing sometime!). Check out the Grand Canyon Railway event page for more info.

We were in Williams, AZ, on the polar opposite of Christmastime . . . on July 4th, 2015, when we met up with other teardrop trailer and vintage trailer owners at a camping meetup at Kaibab Lake Campground. Kaibab Lake Campground is part of the Kaibab National Forest, which has a rather large footprint at the foothills of the Grand Canyon and beyond.

This campground is quite large and can accommodate anything from tents to large RVs. If you check out my previous blog post about the 4th of July trip, the photos of cool vintage and teardrop trailers give you a feel for the site layouts and terrain at the campground.

You can fish and kayak on Lake Kaibab, but in July, the lake was significantly lower than usual due to a dry summer. There is a boat ramp and a fishing pier, although the fishing pier at Kaibab Lake Campground led you out to a grassy area instead of to actual water. Remember to bring your bicycles, so if the fishing scene is a bust, you can at least enjoy tooling around plenty of roadway within the campground itself.

Downtown Williams held a great, old-fashioned 4th of July parade when we were there (plenty of pictures on my last blog post), exactly the kind of thing we were into with our vintage-inspired trailer.

In October 2015, we were back in Williams again when our friends from England came for a visit. This time, we camped an hour away in Grand Canyon National Park for a night, at Mather Campground at the South Rim of Grand Canyon National Park. Honestly, we didn’t care for the campsite itself (#147) at Mather Campground.  We were stuck in a parking pad that was really just a slight bulge in the roadway, a pullover really, with a few large rocks around it. Muddy. Muddy. Muddy.

We did, however, score a great view of a family of elk passing through the site across the way from us, and also scored some close-up pictures while hiding behind trees and bushes.

And we even saw this . . .

Grand Canyon Nationa Park, South Rim, Mather Campground

Again in October, we took in the splendor of Grand Canyon National Park, snapping photos, and looking down upon hiking trails in her belly that we planned to tackle some day.

Grand Canyon National Park South Rim Grand Canyon National Park South Rim

Overall, Williams, AZ, is a great place to situate yourself for a week while you check out some of what you’ve seen here and plenty more–like Flagstaff, AZ, (40 minutes away by car) or Sedona, AZ, (1 hour, 20 minutes away by car) both easy day trips from Williams.

All you have to do now is get out and enjoy it all!


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Happy trails, y’all!

 

WILLIAMS_07042015_140Sue J signature

3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Wildlife IN YOUR FACE in Grand Teton National Park

Or is that ON YOUR FEET?

Wildlife in and around Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming aren’t bashful. In fact, they seem to know they own the place. Boisterous chipmunks like to rub it in your face, or rub their face into you, as the case may be.

Grand Teton National Park and area, wildlife viewings, Wyoming, Jenny Lake, Colter Bay, Jackson Hole, moose, mule deer, bison

In the Tetons, humans can’t vie for secondary nor even tertiary position in the food chain.

Moose ignore you while munching on a veggie breakfast . . .

Even mamma and her baby don’t seem too concerned.

Hell, bison routinely overtake the roadways as if the asphalt were designed for hooves instead of cars. An adult bison weighs about a ton. Needless to say, few autos challenge their collective decision.

This mule deer stepped right up to our campsite at Gros Ventre Campground (the same campground–just south of Grand Teton–where we had all of our moose sightings) and asked for a cup of salt.

Grand Teton National Park and area, wildlife viewings, Wyoming, Jenny Lake, Colter Bay, Jackson Hole, moose, mule deer, bison

We redirected him and his eight-point rack that-a-way while we attempted to discreetly shove our 80-pound dog this-a-way into our car to avoid a confrontation.

As if this all weren’t enough, I had a run-in with this grizzly. As you can see, I was more frightened of him than he of me . . .

grizzly bear, Grand Teton National Park and area, wildlife viewings, Wyoming, Jenny Lake, Colter Bay, Jackson Hole, moose, mule deer, bison

From the safety of a fort we found at the edge of Colter Bay, Mark tried to track the bear after it ran away  . . .

I found an anti-social elk who seemed kinda stiff . . .

elk, Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center, Grand Teton National Park and area, wildlife viewings, Wyoming, Jenny Lake, Colter Bay, Jackson Hole, moose, mule deer, bison

and imagined how many fell to create an archway as grand as this . . .

Grand Teton National Park and area, wildlife viewings, Wyoming, Jenny Lake, Colter Bay, Jackson Hole, moose, mule deer, bison

We had some close-up moments with the wildlife at Grand Teton. It was amazing but is always dangerous. So, make sure you give wildlife respect by giving them space (Yellowstone Bison vs. Humans: You Can’t Fix Stupid), especially when they seem to want to get in YOUR face.

No matter where we drove in Grand Teton, her white-capped, rugged peaks stole the show and crowded the camera lens. Just like the wildlife, the mountains themselves reminded us that we share this planet with more powerful and beautiful things.

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As with Yellowstone  (3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Wild, Wicked Yellowstone National Park), we only spent what added up to a day-and-a-half at Grand Teton. A few days is not enough to explore any national park, and Grand Teton is no different.  It’s a hiker’s, climber’s, explorer’s paradise . . .

Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center, Grand Teton National Park and area, wildlife viewings, Wyoming, Jenny Lake, Colter Bay, Jackson Hole, moose, mule deer, bison
Okay, so I’m just faking it at the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center at Grand Teton National Park, but . . . you know . . . I could do it if I wanted to . . . IF I wanted to. 🙂

And oh so easy on the eyes. Just to prove a point, Mark said there’s no such thing as a bad picture in the Tetons and proved it by willy nilly snapping a picture out the car window without looking. And he was right . . .

Grand Teton National Park and area, wildlife viewings, Wyoming, Jenny Lake, Colter Bay, Jackson Hole, moose, mule deer, bison

We know we’ll be back some day.  But a three-week road trip, in the end amounting to 4,400 miles, requires a tight schedule. Utah and five of its best national parks is the next stop. Onward and outward!



 

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We’re happy to help!

If you have any questions about where we’ve been, any aspects of the experience we didn’t share here, please use our ‘Contact’ page to send us an email with your question(s). We’ll do our best to provide you the answer if we know it or will at least fabricate something entirely convincing.

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To see our original trip route map, click on the first post of this mini-series:

Teardrop Trailer Summer Road Trip: 9 NW States, 8 Nat’l Parks

Or any of our stops so far on the way . . .

Day 1, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Travel Log: Willits, CA, KOA Campground

Early Day 2, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Toilet Bowls, Vintage New Yorkers, and the Eclectic

Later Day 2, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Drive-Thru Redwoods, Giants, and Castles

Day 3, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Gigantic Marshmallows of Oregon

Day 4, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Captivating Washington Coastline

Day 5, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Olympiad Deer, Bald Eagles, and Chica Birds

Early Day 6, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Port Townsend, WA, See It All and Sea Otters Too!

Later Day 6, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, WA

Day 7, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Goodbye Olympic Peninsula; Hello Seattle!

Day 8, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Hay, Washington! Spuds! Spokane!

Day 9, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: It’s a Dog’s Life for Me

Midway on 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Just Stop; You’re Missing It!

3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Wild, Wicked Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone Bison vs. Humans: You Can’t Fix Stupid

One ton of locomotive-grade muscle vs. 140 pounds of brain matter-challenged human flesh.
Do the math . . . carry the nine . . . Bison beats Humans every time.

At Yellowstone National Park, I saw a brown blip on my visual radar. Binoculars confirmed my suspicion. I had spotted a wild animal–in this case, a bison.

bison attacks humans, stupidity, respect for nature, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, wildlife attacks
Bison at river’s edge

I trailed it for a while from across a river until I saw it come to water’s edge and realized it may actually cross the river, and sure enough . . .

bison attacks humans, stupidity, respect for nature, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, wildlife attacks
That bison swam across that river in a FLASH!

Eager to snap a good photo, I ran to the car for a camera, but by the time I returned, the bison was gone. Gone! What the? Where the? Who the?

Holy crap! That’s one fast bison!

I guess I was standing there quite a while searching for the behemoth mammal from roughly 200 yards away from the forested patch it slipped into when I turned around and saw the empty road behind me suddenly full of cars and curious humans. Nobody knew yet what they were looking for. They just figured I’d seen something good and were ready to get their chance to do the same.

That’s right. To the best of my knowledge, nobody else had seen the bison or how fast the steam engine of a mammal only moments ago crossed the waterway. Nobody but me had recently been reminded the impressive power of these animals.

This guy dressed in bright purple and yellow–part of a crew of three similarly dressed tourists who had literally ran INTO, and now out of, the forest in search of the beast–had no concept of its ability to maim.

bison attacks humans, stupidity, respect for nature, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, wildlife attacks
See the brightly dressed tourist on the far right . . . I know for the sure the bison does. Ugggggh.

This misguided photographer sure didn’t get a fresh reminder of the animal’s strength . . .

bison attacks humans, stupidity, respect for nature, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, wildlife attacks
Already, against federal regulations, tourist is less than 25 yards (75 feet) from this large animal.
bison attacks humans, stupidity, respect for nature, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, wildlife attacks
And now tourist is even closer, possibly 25 FEET at the most!

And this trio of clueless tourists were unconcerned, backs turned to the bison, carrying on like they were at a Hollywood photo shoot . . .

bison attacks humans, stupidity, respect for nature, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, wildlife attacks
Not one of these tourists is keeping an eye on the bison!
bison attacks humans, stupidity, respect for nature, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, wildlife attacks
Again, against federal regulations, these tourists are possibly 30 FEET maximum away from the wild bison–posing for pictures, most of the time with their backs to the animal.

In the height of concern for these folks who clearly missed the entire common-sense series of lectures from their parents when growing up, I did the only sane thing I could. I switched the camera to video mode and waited to catch what would surely be the next viral video on YouTube:  “Tourists skewed like toasted marshmallows at Yellowstone National Park”

To avoid being all sensationalist and melodramatic about this account, I did my research and wanted to share with you a few words from a National Park Service web page. It reaffirms the repeated warning on every handout we received at the entry gates to the park, “Federal regulations require you stay at least . . . 25 YARDS away from . . . bison . . .” and “If an animal moves closer to you, you should move to maintain the appropriate distance.”

Here is the additional information I researched directly from the National Park Service web page:

The best description of a bison’s temperament is UNPREDICTABLE. They usually appear peaceful, unconcerned, even lazy, yet they may attack anything, often without warning or apparent reason. To a casual observer, a grazing bison appears slow and clumsy, but he can outrun, out turn, and traverse rougher terrain than all but the fleetest horse. They can move at speeds of up to thirty-five miles per hour and cover long distances at a lumbering gallop.

Their most obvious weapon is the horns that both male and female have. But their head, with its massive skull, can be used as a battering ram, effectively using the momentum produced by two thousand pounds moving at thirty miles per hour! The hind legs can also be used to kill or maim with devastating effect.

So . . . I say . . . go ahead folks. Ignore the warnings at the national parks and get those winning photographs you so desire. I’m just sitting here with my video camera focused just right, waiting to strike gold with my video of YOU on YouTube. You might be infinitely famous as a result of my efforts when your name is as well-known around the world as McDonald’s or Michael Jackson, but you’ll be six feet underground and unable to cash in on your instantaneous fame.

Me, however . . . I’ll be raking in the dough and sporting me some fancy yellow and purple hiking duds like the guy below, only I’ll be . . . you know . . . alive.

bison attacks humans, stupidity, respect for nature, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, wildlife attacks
Most other folks didn’t need a neon sign to know they should stay a safe distance away. The guy in the bright yellow and purple outfit thought otherwise.

Oh. And the bison? If this all played out the way it could have, the bison wouldn’t have fared any better than its victim. Instead of sauntering away, like it was trying to do, it likely would’ve been penalized with a death sentence for bashing its 2,000-pound head into a brightly colored humanoid traipsing into the unfortunate animal’s natural, 75-foot-diameter happy space.

bison attacks humans, stupidity, respect for nature, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, wildlife attacks
2,000 pounds of muscle and mayhem (if it so desired). Can run an easy 35 miles per hour. Idiot tourists live to see another day.

Well done, Einstein. Happy now?

Folks, get out there and have fun. Visit your national parks. But, for the love of Pete, read the handouts you receive at the entry gates. Heed the warnings. Be a good global citizen and respect nature. Your life could depend on it.



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This was just one experience of many on our three-week Teardrop Trailer Summer Road Trip to eight national parks in the western United States. To see our original trip route map, click on the first post of this mini-series:

Teardrop Trailer Summer Road Trip: 9 NW States, 8 Nat’l Parks

or check out any of our posts along the way . . .

Day 1, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Travel Log: Willits, CA, KOA Campground

Early Day 2, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Toilet Bowls, Vintage New Yorkers, and the Eclectic

Later Day 2, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Drive-Thru Redwoods, Giants, and Castles

Day 3, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Gigantic Marshmallows of Oregon

Day 4, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Captivating Washington Coastline

Day 5, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Olympiad Deer, Bald Eagles, and Chica Birds

Early Day 6, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Port Townsend, WA, See It All and Sea Otters Too!

Later Day 6, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, WA

Day 7, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Goodbye Olympic Peninsula; Hello Seattle!

Day 8, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Hay, Washington! Spuds! Spokane!

Day 9, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: It’s a Dog’s Life for Me

Midway on 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Just Stop; You’re Missing It!

3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Wild, Wicked Yellowstone National Park

3-Week Teardrop Trailer Summer Road Trip: 9 NW States, 8 Nat’l Parks

22 days, 3,600 miles, 9 states, 8 National Parks and a whole lotta fun! Final preparations in motion for our next teardrop trailer adventure–Summer Road Trip 2014, starting tomorrow, August 15, 2014.

SB at JT 32

THE STATES:

We’ll be giving you play-by-play highlights direct from our home-built, vintage-style teardrop trailer as we travel from north Los Angeles, California, to Oregon, Washington, across to Idaho and Montana, down through Wyoming and Utah, and back home again through Arizona and Nevada.

Teardrop trailer travels, Teardrop Adventures, Multi-National Park trip, camping, West and Northwest U.S., hiking

THE NATIONAL PARKS:

We will spend time exploring the following and a whole lot more . . .

Oregon: Avenue of the Giants
Washington: Olympic National Park
Wyoming: Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park
Utah: Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, and Zion National Park


JOIN US FOR THE RIDE! FOLLOW US!


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UPDATE: 

THIS TRIP HAS ALREADY BEEN COMPLETED. TO SEE THE PLAY-BY-PLAY OF THE ENTIRE ADVENTURE, VISIT THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES IN THE ORDER LISTED:

Day 1, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Travel Log: Willits, CA, KOA Campground

Early Day 2, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Toilet Bowls, Vintage New Yorkers, and the Eclectic

Later Day 2, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Drive-Thru Redwoods, Giants, and Castles

Day 3, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Gigantic Marshmallows of Oregon

Day 4, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Captivating Washington Coastline

Day 5, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Olympiad Deer, Bald Eagles, and Chica Birds

Early Day 6, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Port Townsend, WA, See It All and Sea Otters Too!

Later Day 6, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, WA

Day 7, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Goodbye Olympic Peninsula; Hello Seattle!

Day 8, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Hay, Washington! Spuds! Spokane!

Day 9, 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: It’s a Dog’s Life for Me

Midway on 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Just Stop; You’re Missing It!

3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Wild, Wicked Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone Bison vs. Humans: You Can’t Fix Stupid

3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Wildlife IN YOUR FACE in Grand Teton National Park

3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Journey to the Center of Utah

Got Gas? Utah Offers an Old-Time Fix

3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Arches National Park, Utah–Simply Speechless

Day 17: 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Canyonlands National Park, Utah

Day 18: 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

Day 19: 3-Week Teardrop Trailer Trip: Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah


DAY_7_01We’re happy to help!

If you have any questions about where we’ve been, any aspects of the experience we didn’t share here, please use our ‘Contact’ page to send us an email with your question(s). We’ll do our best to provide you the answer if we know it or will at least fabricate something entirely convincing.

Remember…

If you see us the road, HONK!
If you take a picture of us and want to share it, or if you just want to say hi, visit us on FACEBOOK at:

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2014 Lake Perris Teardrop Trailer Gathering: Photo Gallery

Okay, Folks! There’s far too many to caption each one. Rather than do so and risk not getting these photos out quickly, here’s what my camera and Mark’s camera captured at the 2014 Lake Perris Teardrop Trailer Gathering:

 


Stay tuned for selections of these photos with special notes/stories that go along with them. If you haven’t signed up to follow TEARDROP ADVENTURES yet, make sure you do today so you don’t miss a thing!

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_5: The Best Grill for Father’s Day

In the last post (1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_4: Grilling on a Sunday Afternoon) you may recall that Mark had finished painting the grill for our 1950 Chevy 3100  Vintage Pickup Truck.  Well, here’s how it looks on the truck . . .

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

Besides the grill, I have so much to show you. We’ve made tremendous progress with so many other features of the truck as well. She sure is looking pretty!

First, for the wheels, we went with baby moons on shiny black rims with chrome beauty rings. Nice, huh?

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

Then Mark refurbished the wood planks and metal separators in the truck bed. Both really pop now . . .

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

Mark was able to make use of the rear bumper that came with the truck but did some cutting and welding to add a nice curve to the ends and, of course, painted it the same shiny black we used on the grill. An update to the rear lights and the tailgate chain helps pull it together. . . .

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

We did our best to carry the wood color of the truck bed into the front cab with entirely custom woodwork for the floor and the center console that Mark designed and built (with my input and thumbs up, of course, because he’s good like that!). We managed to score a nice radio and speakers from the junkyard that sound great and look quite fab with the truck . . . kinda old school.

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

We have lots of places to stow various nitnoids. For instance, we can store stuff in the console, in the glove box, and Mark even custom built an extra box under the passenger seat. There’s also a shelf behind the seat we can make use of if needed.

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

Besides painting the dash and steering wheel shiny black, Mark also painted the doors in the same color. We decided on the best balance between silver and black on the doors to complement the rest of the dash. Mark custom cut and bent the metal for the upper part of the doors. He also had to replace the guides for the side windows . . . the original ones were much too trashed to continue using.

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

Somewhere along the way, we also ditched the original bench seat (it sure had seen better days!) . . .

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration and rebuild

We replaced the original with something we eventually found at a junkyard that cost us $30 or so. There are a few minor tears in the pleather on the passenger side, but other than that, the seat is super comfortable. We may do a custom cover on it some day, but are happy to live with it as is for a while. We also found seat belts that matched reasonably well. Junkyard picking is fun and often well worth the effort if you don’t mind taking the time. For us, its a scavenger hunt. We get a kick out of it.

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

The instrument panel came out great. It originally looked like this . . .

Mark was able to salvage the gas/battery/temp/oil gauge, only having to replace the display (which he easily found on the internet) . . .

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

But since he had transformed our three-on-the-tree manual transmission into an automatic transmission and had also changed up the original chassis, wheels, etc., he had to play around quite a bit with migrating everything that was affected by all those changes, which turned out to be a lot.

One of those things was the P-R-N-D markers for the steering column. Mark didn’t like any of the ones on the market, so decided to create his own. This turned out to be more of a pain in the ass than expected, mostly because there was limited space around the steering wheel for a pointer and for the actual lettering. He figured it out eventually, as you may have noted in the picture above.

The speedometer/odometer was also a pain. A brand new one would cost a couple hundred dollars, so Mark set to the task of using the original speedometer casing, but otherwise altering the thing to suit our needs. There was such minutia involved in getting the right display to line up properly with the speedometer needle that Mark eventually called upon my help in a graphics design program to just create our own and print it out. In the end, we created something that looks very nice. Don’t you think?

1950 Chevy 3100 pickup truck restoration rebuild

I swear the “Susan’s 50 Chevy” addition was HIS idea!  🙂

That’s all for now! As always, stay tuned for updates.

Happy Restoring, Re-using, and Re-purposing to all you builders and restorers out there!

And HAPPY FATHER’S DAY to all you amazing DADS!

I don’t know what we’d do without you!


Related Articles in this 1950 Chevy Restore/Rebuild series:

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore/Rebuild_1: Committing to the Project

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_2: Prepping Chassis and Engine

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore/Rebuild_3: Hard Body Meets Firm Foundation

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_4: Grilling on a Sunday Afternoon


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be sure to FOLLOW US by using the buttons/links
on the upper-left corner of this website
(email option, WordPress user option, TWITTER option, and FACEBOOK option are available).

If FACEBOOK is your thang,
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just click right below to go directly to our FACEBOOK page
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Happy trails, y’all!

Sue J signature

Living the Dream on a Truck Bed of Roses

We’ve just begun breaking in our restored/rebuilt 1950 Chevy 3100 Pickup Truck. It was a real treat last weekend to finally pull our custom home-built teardrop trailer with this beautiful vintage truck.

My fascination with this truck (and others like her) is that she has aged gracefully. I love that she is still pretty, tough, and practical, too. We’ve been calling the truck “Ruby,” but Mark says she’s a whole lot like me. I’ll take that as a compliment. I hope I age as well as she has.  🙂

Today, we made a run to the store to gather up materials for a raised-bed planter in the backyard where we’ll plant a variety of tomatoes, but we also committed to buying roses, even though we only rent our current home. They were far too beautiful and fragrant to pass up. I know they will bring us a lot of joy.

We’re looking forward to a few summertime camping trips up north in Arizona this year, where Ponderosa Pines in the high mountains will protect us from the desert heat.

Hope you all are doing as well as we are. If not, we wish you better days ahead.

Love,


RELATED POSTS:

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore/Rebuild_1: Committing to the Project

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_2: Prepping Chassis and Engine

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_3: Hard Body Meets Firm Foundation

1950 Chevy 3100 Vintage Truck Restore / Rebuild_4: Grilling on a Sunday Afternoon

Building Our Teardrop Trailer From Scratch: Learning by Doing

Photos of Our Own Home-Built, Custom Teardrop Trailer

Life itself is the adventure! #nature #hiking #camping #travel #teardroptrailers #DIY #CoolStuff #CoolPeople #LifeBalance #StuffThatMatters